Illustrator to Embird Tutorial

I spent weeks researching the best amateur hour program that would allow me to use my design skills and apply to my embroidery sewing machine. finally I came to the conclusion that these programs are spendy, and included a bunch of features I didn’t need, and they are not intuitive, so you would need to spend even more on lessons. Post research, I purchased the Embird Base Program, the Digitizing Studio, and the Font Engine Plug-In for about $500.

This trio allows you to convert your vector art into shapes (in your design program of choice), save the file as SVG, and import it to the Embird Studio. Once it is imported there are a series of steps needed to prepare the design for printing on the embroidery machine. However, this tutorial is about how to prepare the vector design / logo for Embird.

My design program of choice is Adobe Illustrator. There are a few changes necessary to convert vector art to a compatible embroidery file. Each shape / path needs to be on it’s own layer. The order of layers will be the opposite as you imagine the design should stitch out.

To accomplish this:

(1) Outline all strokes in your vector design, so they become shapes instead of lines. 

(2) Separate all shapes into their own layer with the “Release Layers to Sequence” option. 

** Before saving the file as a SVG I recommend selecting all your new layers and, from the same menu as step 2,  choose “Reverse Order.”

Outline all strokes in your vector design, so they become shapes instead of lines. 

Separate all shapes into their own layer with the “Release Layers to Sequence” option. 

Product Photo Tips & Tricks

What is the easiest way to change the image background in Photoshop? 

 

Wiki How – this seems like the old way to change a background color. I’m looking for a more efficient way to accomplish a task needing to be done in repetition. Ideally something we could do with a batch edit… but lets not get ahead of ourselves. >_^

 

How to Select and Change Colors in Photoshop by PHLEARN on Youtube

This tutorial is quick and easy and uses photoshop magic. 

Steps: 

Select Color Range

  1. Create New Layer
  2. Go to: “Select” > “Color Range”
  3. Select dropdown: Sampled Colors
  4. Use eyedropper on the background of the image
  5. Selection Preview: Grayscale (anything white/#ffffff is selected)
  6. Drop the Fuzziness slider & use + and – eyedropper tools to refine selection
  7. Click “OK” when the background is selected

Add a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer 

  1. Go to: “Layer” > “New Adjustment Layer” > “Hue/Saturation”
  2. Click “OK” (Selection is now applied to a mask on a layer that controls color)
  3. Change sliders for desired color / effect.. 

This tutorial uses the hue slider to change the blue background to a teal background. Upon testing I learned that lightness slider helped me achieve the desired effect. The goal is to change the background color to white background for all product photos.

However, the photos I hoped to remove the background from have a beige backdrop with lots of wrinkles and shadows .. so I’m still looking for a better way to remove the beige and get a white background for the product photos. Regardless, it was a cool trick and a great place to start. I may still need a combination of other selection tools. Putting this brand on the back burner for now…

Steps above learned from the video posted below (0:55-3:55)

 

 

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Embroidery with Illustrator

Friday, I should have been playing the FML theme song. I found a plugin that is compatible with illustrator, and it only works with the PC version of my CS6 license exclusively for Mac … FML!!!

The tutorial seems like what I wanted, but it’s more expensive than the Bernia software: 

After some research I was able to answer the question: How much would it be to get a CC license and buy the Embroidery i2 plugin? Looks like it would be $20/mo for a year for Ai CC. Two years of that would exceed the price I paid for multiple programs, but they are only licensed for use on my Mac, not my PC … even so. DANG!

There was someone asking about the Embroidery i2 plugin a few years ago on the Adobe forum.. my response is as follows: 

I’ve been heavily researching this topic… The tutorial video looks like it would be perfect .. However, it’s not compatible with my version of illustrator on the operating system my license is for… so to pay $20/mo for a program I already have and pay $3500 for the plugin PLUS annual fees of $1500… *sigh* it’s everything I’ve been looking for and “surprisingly” its NOT affordable (for an amateur such as myself). Figures, I think more and more every day Embird Embroidery Software is winning. In response to the other comment, Embird and programs that are compatible with vector drawing don’t auto convert. Certainly, auto conversion/ auto tracing is not ideal… just like in Illustrator. However, when you import your vector file the goal is to use the vector paths/curves to make the design the way you want it sewn.. without having to re-draw a logo (which is not advised). Embrid PLUS Font Engine Plug-in = $400-$500 (How to Import Vector Graphics with Embird. Unfortunately, the trial version of the software doesn’t let you try it out and I have yet to see a decent tutorial on it). However, my findings are that this combination is the obvious choice. Even with this illustrator embroidery plugin; you would still need to learn how to use the plugin like any other embroidery software. So you might as well buy a new program, built for the trade, that fits your budget. Additionally a software with numerous free tutorials available to help you learn how it works. Sadly, Embroidery i2 for Adobe Illustrator was too good to be true 

Sounds like I need to buy Embird. I don’t think my 2003 Embird license and my 2003 Font Engine is compatible with the vector import feature. The menu is totally different now, and I can’t figure it out if it does or not..  which is a bummer. Perhaps, I could buy the base program and Font Engine Plug-in (with vector import feature) for my birthday, at which point I would feel better about spending that kind of money.  In the end, it would be worth it. 

Embroidery Software and Getting Started

Lately, I’ve had a need for a creative outlet. Recently I was inspired to look into how embroidery sewing machines work. More specifically, what would be needed to turn a vector drawing from Adobe Illustrator into an embroidery design compatible with my machine. I recently got a Bernina Artista 200, and it has been upgraded to be flash drive compatible. The upgrade turned my machine into a Bernina Artista 730. The internet alludes to the fact that these machines are more particular on what size of drive it wants to work with. In fact, the .exp files are quite small and do not need much space. So I was left with the question, what can you do to convert a large flash drive (from a trusted brand/ aka not a cheap one from China) into a small flash drive that is compatible with the sewing machine?

IMPORTANT note: most small flash drives–especially the ones that come from China or a similar areas–are NOT safe, and could contain computer viruses. I have many flash drives from trusted brands that I use all the time. A workaround this problem, is to format your flash drive and “partition” the available space to the size you need. I took an 8GB flash drive and told the drive it only has 256MB to write to. This way the flash drive acts like a small drive that will be compatible with machines that only want a smaller flash drive, like the Bernina Artista 730. I found a WordPress blog called Time Science that walks through how one might accomplish this, How to Downsize a Flash Drive..

I learned that the Official Bernina USB Stick is not necessary from Hoop Lah Carolyn Keber’s Blog, in her article Bernina USB Data Pens. Carolyn uses an Embroidery Program called Embird and she saves her designs as .exp files. I learned about Embroidery File Formats on youtube from Ultimate Stash Embroidery. He taught me that the embroidery master files types are .dst or .exp and they will work using any embroidery machine as well as the file type that is specific for your machine, in my case that would be .art, .pec, or .pes.

I also learned on Carolyn’s Blog about the free software available on the Bernina website for design transfer. It’s called ARTlink 8, I downloaded it and have yet to play with it. Seems like a promising way to write the file to the drive vs. drag and drop. My attempt to download .art files from the Bernina website and drag them to the flash drive I formatted was unsuccessful. I’m thinking the “write to machine” function is necessary for the files to be visible to the machine. I also don’t think I plugged in the drive before tuning my machine on, which was recommended.

My quest started by wondering if I could take a design I created with Adobe Illustrator and use an embroidery plugin to automate the design and not need an expensive hard to use embroidery software. I’ve learned that an embroidery software is needed and I can use my Illustrator skill set to trace a design with the Embird Studio and using the digitize tools. I’ve learned that this program is capable of auto trace, and if the density map shows green and yellow vs. red it will work OK. Just like in Illustrator the trace option is not as good as re-drawing your points with the pen tool. Embird has a tool like the pen tool that will help you define the outline of your design, and then add stitching to fit the design. It also has shape tools and layers similar to the Adobe Illustrator workspace. Once you are finished you can save the .exp file. Then use a program that can transfer the .exp file to your memory stick, like ARTlink 8. Turn off the machine and plug in the drive (Use flash drive as a transfer device, do NOT store your designs on it.. This tip is based on–the amount of time the drive takes to transfer depends on how many designs are on your stick. Keep it Simple Silly!). Turn on machine an click the USB button, on the Bernina this will be on the touch screen. Now use you machine to print the design to the hoop size it was created for.

I’ve learned on the internet Embird is the embroidery software I have been looking for. Instead of investing in the $2,500 Bernina Software (Version 8). Embird also seems more intuitive for someone who already is experienced with Adobe Illustrator, such as myself. All the programs I’ve found have a trial version, so you can always try it out and see if it’s worth a couple hundred dollars. If you only need it sporadically you can keep using the trial version on a virtual computer, or format your computer when you want the trial program again. Embird also has packages you can buy on top of the base program. However, if you don’t need it you don’t have to buy it. Where as, the Bernina Software comes in a big intimidating package; they expect you to get lessons from your local dealer, on top of all the fees you’ve already been hit by…   If I bought all the features Embird offers it might add up to $1,000. Again, I don’t need all the tools Embird has because I have design tools that I am already competent at using. Who knows, maybe later down the line I will feel the need to try the other perks Embird offers.

I found several tutorials on youtube helpful to decide on Embird Embroidery Software. So far, I really like the tutorials by, OML Embroidery. Here’s one of many tutorials I found helpful, Embird Quick Tip: how to digitize like a pro!

Happy Sewing!

Concatenate Formulas with HTML

The following post is to test Concatenate formulas with added HTML to import vendor data for long descriptions. I am going to include several examples that can be used depending on the provided info. 

 

Demo formula:

=CONCATENATE(E6," ",G6," ",H6," ",I6," ",T6," ")

 


 

I’m going for something like this: 

This is a product description. This is a product description. This is a product description. This is a product description. This is a product description. (E6). 

FEATURES

  • Feature 1
  • Feature 2
  • Feature 3

 

FABRICS

  • Fabric

Continue Reading

 

 

The HTML will look like this: 


 

IF there is 1 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 1 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 1 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ",V6," </li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 2 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li>",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 2 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li>",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 2 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ",V6," </li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 3 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li>",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 3 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li>",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 3 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ",V6," </li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 4 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 4 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 4 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ", V6,"</li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 5 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 5 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 5 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ", V6,"</li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 6 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 6 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 6 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ", V6,"</li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 7 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 7 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 7 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ", V6,"</li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 8 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, "</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 8 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, "</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 8 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E169," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G169," </li><li> ",H169," </li><li> ",I169," </li><li> ",J169," </li><li> ",K169," </li><li> ",L169," </li><li> ",M169," </li><li> ",N169, "</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T169," </li><li> ",U169," </li><li> ", V169,"</li></ul> ")


 

IF there is 9 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 9 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 9 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E205," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G205," </li><li> ",H205," </li><li> ",I205," </li><li> ",J205," </li><li> ",K205," </li><li> ",L205," </li><li> ",M205," </li><li> ",N205," </li><li> ",O205," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T205," </li><li> ",U205," </li><li> ",V205," </li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 10 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 10 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 10 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ", V6, "</li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 11 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li><li> ",Q6, " </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 11 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li><li> ",Q6, " </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 11 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li><li> ",Q6, " </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li><li> ",V6, "</li></ul> ")

 


 

IF there is 12 features and 1 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li><li> ",Q6, " </li><li> ",R6, " </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 12 features and 2 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E6," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G6," </li><li> ",H6," </li><li> ",I6," </li><li> ",J6," </li><li> ",K6," </li><li> ",L6," </li><li> ",M6," </li><li> ",N6, " </li><li> ",O6," </li><li> ",P6," </li><li> ",Q6, " </li><li> ",R6, " </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T6," </li><li> ",U6," </li></ul> ")

IF there is 12 features and 3 fabrics the formula could be:

=CONCATENATE(E197," <p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FEATURES</strong></h3><ul><li> ",G197," </li><li> ",H197," </li><li> ",I197," </li><li> ",J197," </li><li> ",K197," </li><li> ",L197," </li><li> ",M197," </li><li> ",N197, " </li><li> ",O197," </li><li> ",P197," </li><li> ",Q197, " </li><li> ",R197, " </li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><h3><strong>FABRICS</strong></h3><ul><li> ",T197," </li><li> ",U197," </li><li> ",V197, "</li></ul> ")

 


 

This reference list should work for my current Columbia spreadsheet. Keeping in mind the letter will be the same but the numbers will change depending on the row they need to apply to. Excel will color code selected cells, if the cell ID is not colored this is an indication of where you made a mistake in your formula. 

 

Finished Reading

Helpful Excel Formulas

This post is a collection of formula’s I have used IRL. These formulas have helped me learn how to manage updates and automate the process to import images and data to my employers website.

How to Change an Image Name into a WebStyle:

*Note – this will only work with styles that include color codes and have the same item number for all options.

This function was used to change the image name into a WebStyle to group each style on it’s respective product page.

=LEFT(A2,12)&”S18”

My images for the brand CHACO all follow the same format:

  • CHC~J106446~CRP~S18.jpg

This equation gave me:

  • CHC~J106446~S18

Since all these images are of Spring 2018 products, I was able to delete all the characters after my second Tilda (~) and add the test S18 to indicate the product pages would be organized by Season Code.

I refreshed my excel equations with SpreadsheetO’s tutorial, “How to Use the String Functions: LEFT, RIGHT MID and LEN.”

How to Delete the Domain Name in a URL:

I used this equation to change data exported from a website and remove the domain name so I could save the data as a .csv and update the URLs so they do not take the reader to a 404 page.

=RIGHT(A2,LEN(A2)-25)

To update URLs you need headers “OLD URL” and “NEW URL”

My 301 redirect importer needs the http://domain.com in the URL to be omitted. For example, if the full URL was:

  • https://spreadsheeto.com/text-functions/#left-mid-right

I would need to remove 25 characters in the beginning of the cell to get the data I need:

  • /text-functions/#left-mid-right

If your URL is shorter or longer change the “25” in the equation to the number of characters to the right of the part of the cell you want to keep.

Once you have the equation you can apply to all cells, copy the data and Paste Special (Values) into a new column. This should be under the header “OLD URL” now you can edit the next column and define if this page is a 404 page the reader will go to the “NEW URL” instead. 

How to Manipulate Data from the Middle of a Cell:

*Note – this will only work if you change your values to match the characters in a given cell.

This function was used to remove the brand code and season code of a product page to get a starting point for the style as it was entered in the POS.

=MID(A2,5,8)

I need to omit the first four characters, and tell excel to start counting at the 5th character and keep counting for 8 characters, the example was:

  • OSP~10000094~S18

I only want the number in the middle, which is searchable in our point of sales system. When I apply the formula above it leaves me with the style number.

  • 10000094

How to Change the Case of a Cell:

This function was used to copy a product title from the vendors website and format it the way we need it on our dealer site. I’m going for proper here, but you can also format with upper and lower.


=proper(A2)
  • A Product Page

=upper(A2)
  • A PRODUCT PAGE

=lower(A2)
  • a product page

Simple and practical, thanks TeachExcel on YouTube, “How to make test cells all lower case or upper case in Excel.”


Now here is where it gets tricky, if I have a cell that needs sentence capitalization–where only the first letter at the beginning of the sentence will be capitalized–we need a heavier formula. 

Thanks to Extend Office, “How To Capitalize First Letter Only Or First Letter Of Each Word In Excel?

I found a formula for this:

=UPPER(LEFT(A2,1))&LOWER(RIGHT(A2,LEN(A2)-1))
  • A product page.

How to Transpose from a Column to a Row:

Some of the Vendors give access to pdf catalogs that I can copy into excel. It’s difficult to deal with the data because it is in one column and I need it to be in rows so I can format it with html before I import it.

Extended Office introduced me to an Offset formula that transposes the data from one column into one row. I will need to proof read the copied data before applying the code but it will allow me to compile the data and prepare it for import.

=OFFSET($A$1,COLUMNS($A1:A1)-1+(ROWS($1:1)-1)*5,0)

The full tutorial can be found on the extended office website in their article, “How to transpose/convert a single column to multiple columns in Excel?” 

How to Combine Multiple Cells into One Cell:

This function was used to combine multiple cells including parts of the product name to one cell I can import as the product page name. This formula would also work for adding a persons first middle and last name to one cell, if the data had each name in it’s own cell. 

=CONCATENATE(B2," ",C2," ",D2," ",E2)

After practicing the formula I was able to get the desired end result: 

  • Women’s Benton Springs™ Full Zip

Thanks to the DullesDistrict video on YouTube, “Using PROPER and CONCATENATE in Excel” I have the full product page title in one column ready for import. 

I could also use this method to combine all the data for my descriptions, while also adding necessary html, for example:

=CONCATENATE(A2,"
  • “,B2,”
  • “,C2,”
  • “,D2,”
  • “,E2,”

”)

Given this strategy, IF I have all the items that need to appear in a bulleted list in separate cells I can add html between the quotes in the formula, which will allow me to prepare the data for import.  

=CONCATENATE(A2,"

FEATURES

  • “,B2,”
  • “,C2,”
  • “,D2,”
  • “,E2,”

”)

Normally I would only include the first break in the HTML, I need to touch base with the developers and get them to fix the spacing between my header and the beginning of my bulleted list. 

How to Combine Multiple Cells to Make a list Separated by Pipes “|” :

*Note – this will only work with data that includes the same number of list items.  

This function was used to combine select cells and add a pipe separator in between “.jpg” file names so they can be imported to the site with a “.csv” spreadsheet file.

I’m using the formula from the Transpose tab here. Depending on how many list items I have I’m changing the “5” in the equation to that number. In my example, I am collecting data from each product and including a default and 3 other alt images. So I will change this integer to a “4”

=OFFSET($A$1,COLUMNS($A1:A1)-1+(ROWS($1:1)-1)*4,0)

I begin these projects by copying file names and pasting them into a spreadsheet. This will be a long list in a column. But I need the data for each product in rows.  So I can create one cell with all the images for that item separated by the pipe “|” symbol. 

My list of image names are in column A, and the Formula will be inserted in C1. I will copy the formula to the next four rows C-F. Then I will hover over the bottom right of cell F1 and drag the black cross curser down the list to F10 (or until you start seeing “0” in cells instead of the data). 

Once I have my data in rows instead of columns I will copy and Paste Special (Values) to apply the next formula. I paste the formula below in G12, and copy the formula down to account for each line of data. 

=C12&" | "&D12&" | "&E12&" | "&F12

Now I will copy the data in column G and paste special (values) to get the full list of items needed for my import.  

Example:

default-image.jpg | alt-image(a).jpg | alt-image(b).jpg | alt-image(c).jpg

I started with a list of all the file names in a different cell within column A. Now I’ve got the image list separated by pipes located in one cell. 

 

How to _____:

*Note – this will only work with ________.

This function was used to  _________.

=

___________________:

____________________.

Important Reminder

When working with formulas it is highly advised that once it gives you the data you need in it’s own cell you add it to a new column or document and make it independent of the source data. To do this you can:

  1. Highlight & copy your data
  2. Insert a new column (Or create a new document)
  3. Select the starting point for your data to copy to: example (A2)
  4. Right click, choose “Paste Special” & “Values” (If you create a new document this is not an option and “Text” is the next best thing).

Now your data is independent of the source data & the formula. This helps when you export your data to a .csv file for import purposes. This is a necessary step, because if your equation or source data is deleted you do not lose the data you formatted.

Clear Cache Instructions

Clear Cache Instructions for 3 common browsers and operating systems:

Internet Explorer 9-11 or Firefox w/ Windows 7, and Safari with Yosemite.

Continue Reading

Internet Explorer (9, 10 & 11) & Windows 7

1. Open Internet Explorer and click the gear icon on the top right corner of your window to open your browser settings.
2. Select “Safety” and “Delete Browsing History
3. Select “Temporary Internet Files and Website Files
4. Uncheck all other boxes/ options and click “Delete

Firefox & Windows 7

1. Click the Menu icon on the top right of the browser (This is the icon/button with 3 horizontal bars)
2. Click “History
3. Select “Clear Recent History
4. Time range to clear will have to be “Everything
5. Click the arrow next to Details if it does not show a list
6. Select at the minimum “Browsing and Download History, Form and Search History, Cookies, Cache, and Active Logins
7. Select “Clear Now
8. Once it is done clearing the history, close the browser
9. Open Firefox and try to access your unresponsive webmail page again.

Safari & Yosemite

1. To clear your cache on your Mac running Yosemite go to your menu bar at the top of your screen. Click “Safari” and choose “Clear History & Website Data” from the drop down menu.

Finished Reading

One Drive Tuts

This post was created because I am learning about OneDrive and how it will work on campus for FLC staff and faculty. The following page includes links to tutorials from the Office 356 support page.

Office 365 Tutorials

Office Support Search

Photoshop Makeover

Photoshop is used all over the media. Many people who learn how to use Photoshop are looking to learn how to touch up their photos. This unit is going to take this idea of a “Photoshop Makeover” and introduce some key tools and tricks when editing. I’ve compiled various video tutorials that will teach the skills necessary to create your own Photoshop makeover projects.

1) Clone Stamp – A retouching tool in Photoshop that allows a user to copy a selected area and paste it over another area in order to cover blemishes. | Online Expert

The clone stamp tool can be useful and a great place to start. I grabbed a real quick tutorial on how to make this tool work to clean up skin blemishes. To use the clone stamp press the [S] key and [alt+click] pixels you want to clone and than click on your picture where you want them to appear. *Note: Re-sample pixels often to avoid a stamping effect.

Photoshop CS3 Tutorial – Clone Stamp Tool

2) Healing Brush – A retouching tool in Photoshop that allows a user to copy an area and drag it across another area of an image to mix pixels and blend color tones in order to cover blemishes. | Online Expert

The first tool in the tools palette that comes to mind when editing the skin of a portrait is nested under the Band-Aid icon (healing brush). In comparison to the last tutorial you will notice that the healing brush tool has been chosen over the clone stamp tool. This is because the healing brush blends light and texture as well as re-samples pixels [alt+click] from one area of the picture to another. When using the spot healing brush, remember to zoom in close enough and minimize the surface area of your brush and use a brush just large enough to cover the blemish you are retouching.

3) Patch – A retouching tool in Photoshop that allows a user to select an area by lasso and replace it with a different selected area in order to cover blemishes. | Online Expert

The patch tool is similar to the spot healing brush tool except the path tool allows for free hand selection.  To use select the patch tool nested under the (Band-Aid icon) healing brush tools. Create a selection as if you were using the lasso selection tool, than drag your pixels to the surrounding area and fade the action immediately. To fade an operation on a mac the shortcut is [command+shift+F]. Armenta claims it’s a “great tool for neck line, singular strands of hair in front of the face, and larger blemishes.” Let’s see what Sean Armenta has to teach about Photoshop healing tools.

How to use the Healing Brush and Patch Tool | SA

4) Gaussian Blur (also known as Gaussian smoothing) is the result of blurring an image by a Gaussian function. It is a widely used effect in graphics software, typically to reduce image noise and reduce detail. | Wiki

This next video walks the viewer through a simple Photoshop makeover. The author uses the following tools and adjustments for this makeover: duplicate background image [command+J]; spot healing brush tool to paint over blemishes; eyedropper tool to pick skin color [alt+click]; brush tool with transparent opacity to edit effects through layer masks; Gaussian blur 5 px for an airbrush effect; curves layer adjustment for eyes and lips; lastly use the burn tool at 30% to darken the eyelashes. Careful when editing because you, “do not want to create a plastic doll” effect.

Photoshop Makeover Tutorial: Intermediate CS4 Walk-Through [In-Depth]

5) Texturizer – [Filter->Texture->Texturizer] You can use the default textures (Brick, burlap, Canvas, and Sandstone) or install your own. This option allows you to adjust the scaling, relief and lighting of the texture. | Echo Enduring

Good, now you can perfect the way a person looks in a portrait with basic editing skills. Next we will learn how to apply makeup to a portrait of a woman with no current visible make-up. This next video is roughly 18 minutes long and teaches us how to: create eye shadow, lipstick and other simple make-up touch-ups. The author uses several tools and skills to add make-up to a portrait of a young woman. Such as: hue layer adjustment; layer mask; brush tool; blend mode = eye shadow;  smudge tool (possibly burn tool) & blur effect for eyelashes; texture layer, Gaussian blur, colorize & hue, layer mask & brush tool = lips; Color Picker, brush tool (75%), layer mask, feather selection = blush. Let’s see it happen.

How to add Makeup in Photoshop

6) High Pass Filter – [Filter->Other->High Pass] Duplicate layer you’s like to sharpen and run High Pass filter on it. Now set the blending mode of this High pass layer to Overlay or Soft Light. | Echo Enduring

Alright so once you have worked with Photoshop makeovers it’s important to start paying attention to the details. This next tutorial focuses on my favorite aspect of portraits. The Eyes! You will learn how to use several tools and effect such as: zoom tool, light source awareness, color sampling,  brush tool, blending modes, Gaussian blur, masked curves adjustment layer, sharpen tool OR high pass filter.

How to Color, Brighten and Sharpen Eyes in Photoshop!

Overview of 9 different techniques | Photoshop Training Channel

a) clean white in the eyes: create new layer, select healing brush tool [sample: “all layers”] (hold [alt] intermittently)

b) select iris and pupil: elliptical marquee tool [alt+shift+spacebar], when your satisfied with your selection copy it to a new layer [command+J]; [filter->sharpen->smart sharpen

c) curves adjustment, layer mask, brush tool, blending mode “luminosity”

d) dodge & burn tools; layer mask, use small brush tool and follow shadows and highlights you see in the image

e) brightness; new layer , white brush tool, blending mode: “overlay”

f) hue, saturation & lightness; layer mask, curves adjustment Blue, Green & Red channels

g) gradient fill adjustment layer, select one eye at a time, click rainbow swatch, change style to angle, blending mode: “color”

h) pupil highlight; new layer, create magenta highlight with brush tool to the right corner of original highlight, change brush color to white and color center in white

i) vignette; [command+option+shift+E]

If you are like me you still want to know more about how to enhance the eyes on a portrait you are editing (I’m making a note to create a lesson especially for working with eyes in Photoshop soon). For now, If you desire to sit in on a (25 mins) tutorial, check out this video.

Creating Amazing Eyes

So take those great tips you just learned about eyes and now learn a different way to make the rainbow eye effect! This video is not professional by any means and uses the Gaussian blur filter vs. the gradient adjustment layer to create a rainbow eye effect.

Photoshop CS4 Rainbow eyes tutorial

7) Blending Modes – Photoshop and Elements allow for layer blend modes that change the way layers react with each other. Some of them you will use in every day work. If you have a photo that is too dark, for example, many times a quick fix is to duplicate the photo layer in the layers palette and change the duplicate layer mode to Screen. If a photo is too light it can sometimes be corrected by duplicating the photo layer and changing the layer mode to Multiply. | North Lite

Can you say glamour? Who doesn’t love that girl’s glamour skin glow effect? The author does the folowing edits to create this effect: copy bg layer; blending mode: “overlay;” Gaussian blur ~20px; layer mask only the skin, brush tool & vibrance adjustment layer.

Glamour Skin Glow: Photoshop

8) Lasso Tool – used for selections where there is no pre-defined shape, and allows you to selest areas by free hand. Simply click and drag to select the outline of your area. To complete the selection drag the mouse back to the start point. At this point you will see the familiar black and white line of a selection. If you let go of your path half way through it will complete the path for you with a straight line back to the first click. | Shape Shed

Now that you know what to do with general skin and facial edits let’s move on to editing hair! The author uses the lasso tool to make selections of hair from the same photo and copies them to a new layer. He edits this new layer with the free transform edit option. [Command+T] when resizing the layer hold [Command+shift+T] to retain the proportion of the layer. Mask out hard edges, and overlap the layers where they need to be incorporated with the rest of the image. Repeat this process until you have a full body of hair. This exercise would be good to try with multiple photos from the same photo shoot. ie; lighting and hair look and feel.

 

Photoshop Tutorial: Hair Makeover Edit: getting that full bodied look [In-Depth]

9) Vector Mask – A vector mask creates a sharp-edged shape on a layer and is useful anytime you want to add a design element with clean, defined edges. After you create a layer with a vector mask, you can apply one or more layer styles to it, edit them if needed, and instantly have a usable button, panel, or other web-design element. | Adobe

On the subject of hair, lets look into learning how to select hair. There are many reasons to select wild hair, or individual strands of hair. For example, you can edit the hue of the hair in your portrait. The author of the next video uses the following tools and adjustments to create a full body hair look and feel. Quick section tool to create a general selection; [alt] deselect background area; Mask selection; in the Mask palette select: “Mask Edge;” set radius to ~20px; lastly use the refine radius brush tool & paint near the end of the hair strands and release. That should give you a pretty specific advanced selection using layer masks.

Photoshop Tutorial: Make Advanced Hair Selections with Masks

10) Liquify – From photo retouching, to artistic effects, the Liquify filter is a powerful tool for every Photoshop user. This filter allows us to push, pull, rotate, reflect, pucker, and bloat the pixels of any image. | Tuts +

Liquify can be a really fun tool, and useful during a Photoshop makeover. There are two main ways it is used for photo editing. Sean Armenta will teach how to use it sparingly and at a very low strength to a professional portrait. He mainly uses 2 Liquify tools,  forward warp tool and the push left tool. Brush density and pressure generally set to 20%, use a much larger brush than you would think you need.  Liquify on both sides of the line you are editing. Push or pull pixels adjacent to the edge. Use short but deliberate brush strokes. Use guides to help align facial structure symmetrically. Remember to use small pushing motions and don’t stretch out your pixel structure too much.

How to Photoshop: Liquify Basics Tutorial by Sean Armenta

 

If you’re not working for a client the liquify tool can be a fun purposeful distortion tool. For example it can give eyes a cartoon effect. I recommend just opening a picture up in liquify and seeing what’s possible to control and what gets too out of hand too quickly. This is what I came up with for my large eyed avatar. W00T!

photoshop edit

 

Photoshop: Large Eyes Effect with the Liquify Tool – Tutorial

 

11) Puppet Warp – intelligent transformation and deformation Photoshop CS5 tool. Puppet warp can be used on selection, layers, and whole photos, to push and pull elements into new configurations. With Puppet Warp, you place multiple “pins” on the image as anchor points. The pins define where image parts remain fixed, and become handles for warping–you drag the pains around to reposition elements of the image. Puppet Warp settings allow for rigid, normal, or distorted pixel fidelity and the pin depth (stacking order) can be defined for layered effects.

This next tutorial teaches how to use puppet warp, clone stamp tool, & liquify for a thinning effect, i.e. an extreme makeover. Begin by making two copies of the original layer. Puppet warp your selection to shrink the image from the sides; the author claims this process is more forgiving than the liquify tool, and that’s why he chose to start with this editing technique. Move anchors strait to the left and to the right (a little up and down is ok).  Use the clone stamp tool to edit away the hard edge from your selection prior to the puppet warp. In the layers palette select both copies of the original layer and [Command+E] merge them together. Use the polygonal lasso tool (nested under the lasso tool) to draw the contour of the new figure (in this case the back). New layer “clone,” select clone stamp [Alt+click] on background and click away the fat. Use Clone stamp to brush away fat on the inside of the back. Use healing brush for any weird spots. Repeat process for the other side. Once the contour of the body fits the size you want the person to be merge the layers [Command+E]. Liquify to shape the body in the way you would like it to look.

Lose Weight In Photoshop | Glazefolio Design Blog

 

Some editors use Photoshop to such an extreme extent, such as the following video. One could argue that a lot has been lost from such an extensive edit. Although it is sort of neat to see it all come together.

100 year old lady made Young and Beautiful again!

Adobe Photoshop Lessons:

  1. Healing Brush & Patch tool; to use the spot healing brush tool press the [J] key and make sure the tool is activated on the tools palette. Click on blemishes surrounded by good skin to “fix” those pixels in the image. It’s better to click around the picture than to drag your cursor like a brush tool. The Healing patch tool is for covering up larger oblong shapes.
  2. Clone Stamp; to use the Clone Stamp press the [S] key and [alt+click] pixels you want to clone and than click on your picture where you want them to appear. *Note: Re-sample pixels often to avoid a stamping effect.
  3. Basic Photoshop Makeover; tools and effects to use and create a basic makeover with: the spot healing brush tool, eyedropper tool & brush tool, Gaussian blur effect, layer masks, & curves layer adjustment.
  4. Make-up; tools and effects necessary for this tutorial are: zoom, hue adjustment, texture, fine tuned brushes, layer masks, and blending modes.
  5. Eyes; we learned how to sharpen, brighten, and colorize eyes through simple to advanced editing techniques.
  6. Hair; advanced selection tools using layers masks, edge refinement and brush tools.
  7. Weight; editing a figures weight can be managed with three main tools and or effects: liquify, puppet warp, clone stamp & healing brush.
  8. Practice; the learning curve is the most difficult part of Photoshop, stick with it and make sure you are using layer masks and copying your original layers. Be careful not to over-do an edit, like when the old woman became young again in that last tutorial. Sometimes it’s good to create a surrealistic environment for your figures and go all out with the editing. Nevertheless, I will save my ideas on that for a different lesson.

Happy Editing!